Archive for Horcruxes

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part II

Posted in Action/Adventure, Movie Reviews, Sci-Fi/Fantasy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on July 16, 2011 by Mystery Man

PLOT (spoiler alert!!!):

After giving Dobby a proper burial at Shell Cottage, Harry speaks with Griphook the Goblin about breaking into Bellatrix Lestrange’s vault at Gringotts, as he believes that a Horcrux is hidden there. Griphook agrees to take Harry, Ron, and Hermione to Bellatrix’s vault if they give him the Sword of Gryffindor in return. Harry then asks Ollivander, the wandmaker, to identify the wands they took from Malfoy Manor. Ollivander says they belong to Bellatrix and Draco Malfoy, but Malfoy’s wand has changed its allegiance to Harry. Harry then reveals that he knows Lord Voldemort has stolen the Elder Wand, the most powerful wand to ever exist, from Albus Dumbledore’s tomb.

After using Polyjuice Potion to disguise herself as Bellatrix, Hermione manages to slip past the Gringotts goblins along with Ron, also disguised, and Harry and Griphook, who are under Harry’s Invisibility Cloak. Griphook safely guides them past the dragon guard and into Bellatrix’s vault where Harry discovers the next Horcrux, Helga Hufflepuff’s Cup. When Harry manages to obtain the cup, Griphook takes the sword and runs. With Gringotts security on their tail, the three heroes jump onto the back of the dragon guard and fly far away from Gringotts. During their escape, Voldemort enters Harry’s mind and discovers that they have been destroying his Horcruxes. He then begins keeping his snake, Nagini with him at all times. During the vision, Harry sees that the next Horcrux is something that belonged to Rowena Ravenclaw and is at Hogwarts.

When Harry, Ron, and Hermione arrive in Hogsmeade, they unknowingly set off a Caterwauling Charm, and have to hide. They are rescued by Aberforth Dumbledore, Albus’s brother. Aberforth seems to have lost all hope, but Harry convinces him to let them into Hogwarts so they may find the Horcrux. Aberforth instructs a portrait of his younger sister, Ariana to fetch Neville Longbottom, who leads the three friends through a secret passage back to Hogwarts. Severus Snape, now headmaster of Hogwarts, has heard of Harry’s return and gathers all students and staff in the Great Hall to inform them of their punishment should they aid Harry in any way. Harry steps forward and confronts Snape, but Professor McGonagall defends Harry by firing her own spells at Snape. Snape retreats to Lord Voldemort and McGonagall gathers all beings in Hogwarts to prepare for the final battle. Luna Lovegood finds Harry and introduces him to Helena Ravenclaw, daughter of Rowena and ghost of Ravenclaw house. Helena reveals that she knows of Voldemort and the dark magic he had performed on her mother’s lost diadem. When Harry tells her that he wishes to destroy it, she tells him it is hidden in the Room of Requirement. While Harry is talking with Helena, Ron and Hermione go to the Chamber of Secrets and Hermione destroys the cup Horcrux with a Basilisk fang. After being engulfed by a torrent of water caused by the destruction of the Horcrux, the two share a brief kiss. Harry goes to the Room of Requirement where he finds Malfoy, Goyle, and one of their fellow Slytherins. Goyle attacks Harry, but Ron and Hermione arrive and defend him. Goyle casts a Fiendfyre curse in the Room of Requirement, forcing the three heroes to retreat. Before leaving, Harry saves Malfoy and his companion, but Goyle and the Room of Requirement itself are destroyed in the fire. Once outside the room, they destroy the Ravenclaw diadem with a basilisk fang and Ron quickly kicks away the destroyed Horcrux. The trio go on a search for Voldemort so that they may kill Nagini, the final Horcrux, but when they discover him, he has Nagini kill Snape to make the Elder Wand truly his. Before he dies, Snape passes Harry memories via a tear to be used in the Pensieve in Dumbledore’s office.

As Voldemort gives Hogwarts a reprieve, Harry looks into Snape’s memories and learned that he and his mother, Lily Potter, were close friends and that Snape defected from Voldemort after Lily’s death. From the memory, Harry learns that he himself is a Horcrux, as Voldemort’s soul was very fragile at the time he killed Lily and James. Due to the fragile state of his soul, a result of creating numerous Horcruxes, and his attempt to murder an innocent child, a part of Voldemort’s soul broke away, and attached itself to the only living thing in the house, this happened to be Harry. Harry then goes into the Forbidden Forest to face Voldemort, where he is hit with a Killing Curse. Harry enters a state of limbo, where he meets the spirit of Dumbledore. He then returns to the world of living and his reappearance re-ignites the fighting. As he and his friends try to kill Nagini, they lose their basilisk fangs, until Neville decapitates the snake with Gryffindor’s sword, destroying the last of the Horcruxes. Voldemort is then killed by his own Killing Curse as the Elder Wand falls into Harry’s hands. With the battle over, Ron suggests that they keep the Wand, because it would make them invincible, but Harry wordlessly snaps the Elder Wand in half, thinking it would be too much power to have.

Nineteen years later, Harry and Ginny Potter, along with Ron and Hermione Weasley, see their children off on the Hogwarts Express. But Harry’s middle child, Albus Severus, reveals his fears to Harry about the possibility of him being sorted into Slytherin house. Harry confides in his son regarding his namesake and assures him that the Sorting Hat will allow him to choose his own house. Albus gets on board the train, and both married couples watch their children leave to have their own adventures at Hogwarts.

REVIEW:

Every generation seems to have that one franchise that changes everything. For my generation, we have the Holy Trilogy (the Star Wars films for those not familiar with the terminology), the next one had the Lord of the Rings trilogy, but this current generation has literally grown up with the actors in this franchise, and have cemented Harry Potter in the echelon of great, moneymaking franchises.

The plot of  Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part II picks up right where the previous film left off. I’ll discuss the separation later. Harry, Ron and Hermonie are still in search of the horcruxes so that Voldemort can be defeated. Meanwhile, at Hogwarts, Snape has been promoted to Headmaster and the school grounds are guarded by Dementors.

Before returning to Hogwarts, the trio makes a stop at Gringott’s bank to explore Bellatrix’s vault, where they find one of the Horcruxes. Of course, in there, they have to deal with this multiplicity spell and a double cross by Griphook, not to mention have to evade and escape the dragon guarding it.

After their daring escape, they apparete to Hogsmeade, but set off some type of alarm, which sets the Death Eaters on their trail. Before they can be detected, a mysterious figure pulls them aside. It is discovered that he is Dumbledore’s brother, Abeforth, and he helps them get back in the castle, with the help of the painting of his sister and Neville Longbottom.

This leads to the scenes we’ve been waiting 10 yrs for, the final battle between good and evil. Some of the character we’ve been waiting to see actually use their magic show what they can do, some characters die, and others slither away into the darkness.

The film is definitely the ultimate payoff for those of us that have been around since the beginning. Sure, when you think about it, this is kind of a sad day, but hey, it was a good run, and with the exception of the previous film, there are no real complaints.

Let’s talk about that for a bit, shall we. This film, which is based on the final book, was split into to films. If you will recall in my review of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part I, I wasn’t necessarily giving a ringing endorsement of the split. However, as much as I complained about he previous film being nothing more than an overpriced drama, there were some parts of it that were done well because of it being a separate film. Had both of these films been merged into one, I believe there would have been lots of things left out that really deserved to be seen on film.

I was convinced to see this in 3D. I don’t really know why this was released in (and converted to) 3D. I believe it would have been just as spectacular without it. I just didn’t see anything that warranted me spending the extra $$$. I can’t believe I was coerced into supporting this gimmick.

This might very well be the most special effects laden entry in the franchise. There isn’t anything wrong with that, either. If you read the book, it plays out as if it were meant to be seen on the big screen rather than in someone’s imagination.

For the most part, the film stays true to the source material. There are some things cut here and there, as well as some additions that I believe weren’t necessary, but we can all rejoice in how this film proves you don’t have to change someone’s work in order to create a great story for the big screen.

In an interview earlier this week, I heard Daniel Radcliffe say something about how he wanted to keep some of the lensless glasses. That’s great, but if you will watch in nearly every scene, he has on a different pair of glass, some with lenses and some without.

Personally, I think a film of this high caliber should be able to film something like that. Don’t you agree?

It was good to see some of those that have been nothing but background characters, mostly, get their chance to shine here, such as Professor McGonagall , Molly Weasley, and especially Neville.

Speaking of Neville, I know that we’ve watched all of these characters grow up over the years, but think about what he was like in Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone and compare that to how much of a force he was in this film. It really is a shame we didn’t see more of him over the course of the series.

Speaking of characters, I do believe, with the exception of the first film, that this is the first film to feel like it is truly about Harry and not some other character or event.

I also belive this to be the shortest of all the Potter films, at 2 hrs 10 min. With the exception of the beginning and a bit of a slowdown heading into the climax, this film is right up my alley in that it is not stop action.

Make no mistake, this is not the happy-go-lucky kiddie flick that first two films were. Someone even pointed it out the other day that when the opening logo is shown, you don’t hear th whimsical “Hedwig’s Theme” anymore, but instead its som dark, sinister chord, with maybe a modulated version o it underneath.

Speaking of the darkness…and this goes back to the 3d, in a way…this film is very dark. Part of the reason for that is that it occurs mostly at night, the other has to do with wearing those 3D glasses.

The epilogue was actually very well shot, but I couldn’t help but wish they would have gone one and made the trip to Hogwarts so that we could see what changes have happened there in the 19 yrs.

Well, the Harry Potter franchise comes to an end, and boy does it go out with a bang! Two things are going to happen to films now. There will be plenty of book series that are going to be positioned to be the next Potter, but pretty much all of them will fail. Just think of  The Golden Compass, Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief or Cirque du Freak: The Vampire’s Assistant for examples. While Twilight may be raking in some serious bank right now, truth be told, it doesn’t appeal to both sexes, but rather tween girls and gay men.

So, should you see Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part II? I have to say yes, especially if you’ve seen the other films. On top of that, think about how often a worthy franchise comes along. Do you really want to miss out on a satisfying conclusion like this one has? So, stop reading and go out and see this right now!!!

5 out of 5 stars

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part I

Posted in Action/Adventure, Movie Reviews, Sci-Fi/Fantasy with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on November 20, 2010 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

The film opens with Severus Snape arriving at the estate of Lucius Malfoy to deliver his intelligence about when Harry Potter will be moved from Privet Drive. The Death Eaters are gathered at a table, with Voldemort at the head. They argue about tactics, and Voldemort feeds a Hogwarts professor to Nagini.

After the title card, the camera reveals Hermione Granger in her room. After packing her things, she casts an “obliviate” spell on her parents to make them forget her. At Privet Drive, Harry’s foster family packs up their things and leave the house because it has become unsafe. The Order of the Phoenix arrive, and Mad-Eye Moody unveils the plan to move Harry. The team splits into groups of twos, with one member of each pair drinking Polyjuice Potion in order to look like Harry. As the decoys fly off, Harry leaves in Hagrid’s sidecar, just as he arrived at Privet Drive 17 years ago. The Death Eaters immediately attack, resulting in a mid-air battle in which Harry’s owl is killed. Voldemort attacks Harry with Lucius’ wand, but Harry shatters it. The Order rendezvous at The Burrow, the home of the Weasleys. They realize that Mundungus Fletcher is the traitor in their group, and that Mad-Eye did not survive.

During the night, Harry tries to slink off during the night, unwilling to risk anyone else’s life on his behalf. Ron stops him and explains that the Order’s work is about more than just him. The next day, Rufus Scrimgeour executes Dumbledore’s will, bequeathing a deluminator to Ron, a copy of The Tales of Beelde the Bard to Hermione, and the Snitch that Harry caught in his first Quidditch match. He also bequeaths to Harry the sword of Gryffindor, but Scrimgeour says it is not Dumbledore’s to give and also the sword is missing. Bill Weasley and Fleur Delacour are married in a tent at The Burrow. Harry learns of Dumbledore’s dark past at Godric’s Hollow during the reception and meets Luna Lovegood’s father, Xenophilius, who is wearing a pendant with a mysterious symbol. The reception is attacked by Death Eaters. Harry, Ron and Hermione apparate to London, and they are attacked again in a coffee shop. They take refuge at 12, Grimmauld Place where they find Kreacher, who reluctantly helps them deduce that the locket of Salazar Slytherin, which is a horcrux, is in the possession of Dolores Umbridge.

The trio infiltrate the Ministry of Magic using Polyjuice Potion. Harry stupefies Dolores and Hermione snatches the locket from around her neck. During their escape, Ron is grievously wounded. Since Ron is too ill to apparate, the trio have to move on foot during the day. Unfortunately, Dumbledore never told Harry how to destroy a Horcrux, and all their attempts to destroy the locket fail. They take turns wearing the locket, as it makes its wearer brood on negative thoughts. As they walk through the countryside, Ron listens to the radio for the names of missing wizards, hoping not to hear the names of his family. He grows suspicious of Harry and Hermione, especially as they conference with each other. Eventually, Hermione realizes that the sword of Gryffindor will destroy the horcrux since it has been dipped in basilisk blood. Feeling useless and unwanted, Ron decides to leave. Frightened even more by his departure, Harry and Hermione listen to Ron’s radio and do a silly dance to “O Children” by Nick Cave in an effort to relieve the unbearable tension.

Harry convinces Hermione to travel to Godric’s Hollow, where they find the grave of his parents. They are followed by Bathilda Bagshot who takes them to her home. As Harry peppers her with questions, Hermione explores the house. When Bathilda finally speaks, she does so in parseltongue, just as Hermione discovers the body of the real Bathilda. The pair fight with Nagini, whose Polyjuice Potion has worn off, and barely escape. During the fight, Hermione accidentally breaks Harry’s wand.

As he keeps watch one night, Harry follows a patronus in the shape of a deer onto a frozen pond. The patronus disappears under the ice, revealing the sword of Gryffindor at the bottom of the pond. While trying to retrieve it, Harry is almost drowned by Slytherin’s locket, which takes on a life of its own, nearly strangling him. He is saved by Ron, who has returned. Harry insists that Ron destroy the locket with the sword. After Harry opens the locket, Voldemort’s voice taunts Ron about his insecurity. He creates an illusion of Harry and Hermione having sex, and a terrified Ron manages to smash the locket with the sword.

Together again, the trio decide to investigate the pendant that Xenophilius Lovegood was wearing, because the symbol keeps appearing in books Hermione is reading. At his home, Xenophilius tells them the story of the Deathly Hallows, and reveals that the elder wand will make its bearer the most powerful wizard in the world. As they try to leave, Xenophilius blocks their exit, explaining that the Death Eaters have kidnapped Luna and Harry is his only ransom. The Death Eaters descend on the house, and during the attack, the trio apparates to a forrest.

They are immediately set upon by a group of snatchers, who eventually catch them. During the chase, Hermione disfigures Harry to protect his identity. They all lie about who they really are, and the snatchers take them to Lucius’ estate, suspecting that they might actually have captured Harry Potter. At Malfoy Manor, Bellatrix imprisons Harry and Ron in the cellar, where she has also imprisoned Luna, the wandmaker Ollivander, and the goblin Griphook; meanwhile, Bellatrix tortures Hermione to try to find out how they acquired the Sword of Gryffindor, which she had believed to be safe in her bank vault.

Dobby apparates into the dungeon, and Harry formulates an escape plan. As they rescue Hermione from Bellatrix, Dobby is killed. The trio bury him on the top of a sand dune. The film closes with Voldemort opening Dumbledore’s tomb and removing the elder wand from the dead wizard’s grasp.

REVIEW:

 Continuing, or rather, concluding the Harry Potter franchise is a challenge, which is probably why the filmmakers decided to split the final book into two parts (combined with making more money). However, after watching this film this afternoon, I’m not so sure that was a good idea.

Before you all start jumping down my throat for that statement, let me explain. This is not a bad film. It is beautifully shot and very faithful, from what I recall, to the book. However, there was no real climax at the end. It just ended.

Now, there are films that are split that end on a down notes, The Empire Strikes Back, comes to mind, but the plot just doesn’t allow itself to be split into two parts this way. The whole time I was watching this film, I was hoping that something would happen to really catch my attention. Unfortunately, that didn’t happen.

The special effects here are on par with the rest of the franchise, which isn’t bad, but seeing as how this is part of the finale, I was kind of wishing they would up the ante. Maybe in part II, they will.

As I said, the plot is about a close as you can get to the source material. If you’re an avid reader of this blog, then you are more than aware of how much I detest those that stray too far from said material, so this was a breath of fresh air.

This is a dark film. Some of you out there are going to love this kind of thing. Personally, I prefer lighter faire, such as Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone. Having said that, the darkness that each film has garnered is reflective of the books, so I won’t jump on them for making this flick so dark, however, I can still say that I miss the, for lak of a better term, magic and whimsy from the first couple of films.

Harry, Ron, and Hermoine are the focal point of this film. Occasionally we see Voldemort and a couple of other characters, but the trio is the entire film (as they pretty much have been the entire franchise). It is obvious the actors have grown, not only in terms of aging, but as actors and the chemistry between them is amazing.

Ralph Fiennes as Voldemort is just itching for a final showdown with Harry. It’s coming…just hang in there.

Helena Bonham Carter returns as the psychotic Bellatrix Lestrange, as proven with her torture of Hermoine near the film’s end.

This entry into the franchise contains more action than all the other’s combined. While I love my action, I just sort of felt like some of this was just stuck in there for the hell of it. Of course, when I was reading the book, I said that it felt like it was written with the intent of being a movie, so I guess this is the result.

I have to mention this random animated scene that explains what the deathly hallows are. While Hermoine is telling the tale, we get an animated sequence to her words. Not to take anything away from it, but the animation was show pointed that the characters reminded me of the Primes from Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen. It didn’t work for me. Not that there was anything wrong with it, but this was just so random and they didn’t bother to put oddly animated sequences in the previous films, so why start now?

Final verdict on Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, part I? Well, it is a pretty good film. I’m sure many will go so far as to call it great and put it on their best of and favorite lists of the year. Chances are it may make one of those lists of my own, but to be honest with you, I didn’t love it. It just felt like something was missing. It plods along and you sort of feel like they’re pushing towards something. If that something is the epic confrontation that will happen in the second film, that’s fine, but there should have been something more in this one. If you can get past leaving the theater unfulfilled, then I highly recommend this, otherwise, I suggest wait until the summer, rent it before part II comes out and watch it then.

4 out of 5 stars