Archive for Lochlyn Munro

A Night at the Roxbury

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , on August 27, 2013 by Mystery Man

PLOT (spoiler alert!!!):

Wealthy Yemeni-American brothers Steve (Will Ferrell) and Doug Butabi (Chris Kattan) enjoy frequenting nightclubs, where they bob their heads in unison to dance music (specifically Haddaway’s hit song “What Is Love”) and fail miserably at picking up women. Their dream is to party at the famous L.A. nightclub The Roxbury, a fabled nightclub where they are continually denied entrance by a hulking bouncer (Michael Clarke Duncan). By day, the brothers work at an artificial plant store owned by their wealthy father, Kamehl Butabi (Dan Hedaya). They spend most of their time goofing off, daydreaming about opening a club as cool as the Roxbury together, and Doug using credit card transactions as an excuse to hit on a phone approval operator. The store shares a wall with a lighting emporium owned by Fred Sanderson (Dwayne Hickman). Mr. Butabi and Mr. Sanderson hope that Steve and Emily (Molly Shannon), Sanderson’s daughter, will marry, uniting the families and the businesses to form the first plant-lamp emporium.

After a day at the beach the brothers decide that tonight is the night they will finally get into the Roxbury. Returning home, Doug gets into a heated argument with their father about going out clubbing instead of staying home. Their father has planned a dinner party with Emily and her parents. The angered Mr. Butabi then denies them access to their BMW car and their cell phones. They are given enormous cell phones by their mother (Loni Anderson) and allowed use of the fake-plant store’s delivery van, they are quickly rejected by the doorman (Michael Clarke Duncan). After discovering they might bribe their way into the club, the brothers drive around looking for an ATM. They get into a fender-bender with Richard Grieco (playing himself) and to avoid a lawsuit, Grieco uses his fame to get them into the popular club. There they meet the owner of the Roxbury, Benny Zadir (Chazz Palminteri), who listens to their idea for a nightclub of their own. He likes them and sets up a meeting with them for the next day. The brothers also meet a pair of women at the Roxbury: Vivica (Gigi Rice) and Cambi (Elisa Donovan), who see them talking to Zadir and think that the brothers are rich.

On the way to the afterparty at Mr. Zadir’s house, the brothers annoy his driver and bodyguard Dooey (Colin Quinn) by making him stop to buy fluffy whip and making jokes about sleeping with his parents. As revenge, the next day Dooey denies them entry into Zadir’s office for their meeting. He tells the brothers that Zadir was drunk out of his mind last night and does not know who they are. In reality, Zadir really wants to see them, but does not have their contact information. The girls break up with the Butabi brothers after realizing they are not really wealthy. The brothers fight and Doug moves out of their shared bedroom and into the guest house. Meanwhile Steve is forced into an engagement with Emily. The wedding is held in the backyard of the Butabi residence, but is interrupted by Doug. Having gone on a fluffy-whip-fueled bender, he interrupts the wedding, reconciles with his brother, and the wedding is called off. Afterwards, Richard Grieco (a guest at the wedding) talks to Mr. Butabi to help him understand that Steve was not ready for marriage, and that Butabi is too hard on Doug.

The movie ends as the Butabi brothers happen upon a hot new club. The building is unique in that the exterior is constructed to resemble the interior of a nightclub, and the interior resembles a street — this was an idea pitched by Doug and Steve to Zadir earlier in the movie. Attempting to enter, they are surprised to find their names on the VIP list. In addition, Zadir reveals that to reward their idea, he has made them part-owners of the club. Their new-found success comes full circle when they meet two women in the club: Doug’s phone representative from the credit card company (Meredith Scott Lynn) and a police officer (Jennifer Coolidge) whom Steve earlier flirted with while getting a ticket.

REVIEW:

In the late 90s, after the “frat pack” days of Saturday Night Live consisting of Adam Sandler, Rob Schneider, David Spade, Chris Farley, etc., we came across a nice little era that brought us a nice little sketch about a couple of brothers that were always in the club bobbing their heads to Haddaway’s “What is Love”. Who knew that this little sketch would turn into a pretty big film, A Night at the Roxbury.

What is this about?

Chris Kattan and Will Ferrell extend their “Saturday Night Live” skit about dimwit club-goers Doug and Steve Butabi, who gain entry to the swanky Roxbury nightclub after a run-in with Richard Grieco.

What did I like?

They live. If I recall, these guys didn’t speak in their sketch, but instead just made some noises when they were sandwich dry-humping some chick. It makes you wonder how they could even warrant having a full-length film. Well, someone had the idea that these are real guys with real lives and real problems. Wile it may not have been the best, it was better than what we already knew. Unlike The Coneheads and Wayne’s World, where we knew at least a little about the characters, more so with the Coneheads, these guys were just random barfly creeps., if you will.

Cast and cameos. Chris Kattan and Will Ferrell bring their characters to the big screen and give “life”, but it is the cameos from the likes of Richard Greico, Michael Clarke Duncan, Chazz Palminteri, and Loni Anderson that stood out to me. Not to mention a cast that brought in SNL darling Molly Shannon, fellow cast member Colin Quinn, character actors Dan Heyda, Lochlyn Munro, and a very young Jennifer Coolidge. They really keep this film rolling along, if you ask me. I kind of wish they would have found a way to bring in some of the guys that were with them in the sketches, though, specifically Jim Carrey or Sylvester Stallone.

Song. Ah, the late 90s…when total crap music could still make you get up and hit the dance floor….maybe with a little help from some drinks and a pretty girl *AHEM* Sorry, that’s a story for another time. I do recall hearing Haddaway’s “What is Love” over and over and over again. I think that just about the time it had died out, I seem to remember it being replaced by the “Macarena”, this sketch started and it was brought back to prominence. Now, 15 yrs later, I had nearly forgotten that it existed, but appreciate the cheesiness that it had, as well as the memories associated with it, both personally and involving the Roxbury Guys.

What didn’t I like?

Flimsy. The so-called “plot” is so flimsy, that I’m surprised the whole picture didn’t fly away when some walked by. My goodness gracious, I don’t believe these people thought to do anything with these characters other than bring them to the big screen. Also, it is quite predictable with the whole brothers splitting up only to be reunited at the wedding and meet up with the club owner at the club they told him about, and they just happen to find their dream girls there. It was way too easy to see that coming, at least for me.

Jump. Earlier I mentioned how I appreciated the cameos in this flick, and I really did. However, I have to wonder what rock they dug Richard Greico out from under to stick him in this. Granted he is playing himself and serves only to get the brothers in the Roxbury and set things right at the end. Considering how they idolized the guy, it seems he would have worked better as a guardian angel who just happened to take the form of Richard Greico.

Stretch. Of all the SNL films, this isn’t the worst, but it makes you come to the realization as to one of the reasons we don’t see anymore sketches brought to the big screen. Stretching these characters out to this point in order to force a film into production serves no real purpose. Making matters worse, The Blues Brothers are similar characters in terms of how much we know about them from the sketch, but the film version is regarded as on of the best SNL films. It just goes to show how far things have fallen, and don’t forget how horrible MacGruber  the latest from the studio, which was horrible, as well.

What can I say about A Night at the Roxbury? This is one of those films that appeals to some and appalls others. For me, it has moments, but is nothing special. I would watch it again and again, but that is more for nostalgia reasons. Do I recommend it? Yes, but only half-heartedly. Not everyone will like this. If you are a fan of the late 90s SNL sketches, then you’re more than likely love this. Otherwise, take your best guess as to whether or not you should check it out.

3 1/2 out of 5 stars

Scary Movie

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews, Spoofs & Satire with tags , , , , , , , , , , on January 19, 2012 by Mystery Man

PLOT (spoiler alert!!!):

An 18-year-old girl named Drew Decker (Carmen Electra) receives a threatening phone call while home alone one night. In an opening which closely mirrors Scream, Drew is chased outside by Ghostface, who then rips off her sweater and skirt, leaving her clothed in her white bra and thong. Drew runs through her garden sprinklers but she is then stabbed in the breast by Ghostface, removing one of her silicone breast implants, hit by a car driven by her father (who was getting oral sex by his wife so he didn’t notice Drew), and then killed by Ghostface.

The next day, Cindy Campbell (Anna Faris), meets up with her boyfriend Bobby Prinze (Jon Abrahams) and her friends, Brenda Meeks (Regina Hall), Ray Wilkins (Shawn Wayans), Greg Phillipe (Lochlyn Munro), and Buffy Gilmore (Shannon Elizabeth). Various news teams – including hack reporter Gail Hailstorm (Cheri Oteri) – converge on the school in the wake of Drew’s brutal death. Gail hooks up with Buffy’s mentally disabled brother Doofy (Dave Sheridan), hoping to milk the facts out of him. One day, while Cindy is in class, someone mysteriously leaves a note saying I KNOW WHAT YOU DID LAST HALLOWEEN. Cindy then realizes that Drew’s murder occurred exactly one year after she and her friends accidentally killed a man during a wild car ride (but the man is shown only to be unconscious and tries to tell them before being knocked out again). Unwilling to face incarceration, the next day a series of increasingly bizarre events take place. Various members of the group receive threatening notes from Ghostface and are rapidly dispatched, but most remain steadfastly oblivious to the rising body count. The killer then attacks Cindy in her house. She tries to call the police but the killer escapes. Bobby arrives at her house but Ghostface (before he left) drops the knife and gloves which leads Cindy to thinking that Bobby is the killer the police arrest him (though he is let out the next day). Greg is killed by Ghostface in plain view. Buffy tries to get help, but Buffy is at a beauty pageant and her talent was acting so they thought the cries were part of her act. Buffy, high on the success brought by the murder, becomes Ghostface’s next victim. During the murder, Buffy thinks it’s a game, so she does every cliche done by a white female in a horror film. Ghostface decapitates her (even though her head keeps talking afterwards). Later, Ghostface sticks his penis through Ray’s head, seemingly killing him. Ghostface then attempts to dispose of Brenda during a showing of Shakespeare in Love, but the moviegoers, fed up with Brenda’s constant loud interruptions during the movie, kill her before Ghostface can.

Cindy throws a house party, hoping for safety in numbers. During the party, Bobby and Cindy go up stairs and have sex, no longer making Cindy a virgin. Ghostface unexpectedly appears and stabs Bobby, before disappearing quickly. Cindy gets a gun from a drawer near the entrance, Bobby follows and she tends to his wounds. Shorty (Marlon Wayans), Brenda’s stoner brother, comes up from the basement and informs them that the killer has murdered everybody in the house. Bobby takes the gun and shoots Shorty, revealing that his wound was an elaborate ruse. Ray then arrives on the scene – whereupon Bobby reveals to Cindy that he is now a homosexual, and so is Ray, but Ray immediately denies it confirming that he is straight. They announce their plan to kill her father and frame her sister. Bobby says he did it because Cindy never had sex with him and Bobby gleefully points out that even though their plan lacks sense it doesn’t matter, since horror movies are not noted for their logic, they also say that are just copying the killer and are not the actual killers (“We’re copying a killer that already exists.”). Ray and Bobby also came up with a plan to make themselves look like heroes by giving each other stab wounds to indicate they fought her. But, Ray stabs Bobby repeatedly and nearly kills him revealing Ray’s motive was because his favorite show The Wayans Bros. had been cancelled.

However, the real Ghostface abruptly turns up and stabs Ray, who collapses on top of Bobby in the Doggy style position. The killer then attacks Cindy, but she successfully subdues him by employing moves copied from The Matrix and kicks him through a window. Nonetheless, Ghostface vanishes before the police arrive.

At the police station, Cindy and the local sheriff (Kurt Fuller) realise that (through a montage similar to that of The Usual Suspects) Doofy – the only one who knew about the car accident – was actually faking his disability and is the true killer . Unfortunately, Doofy has already escaped with Gail Hailstorm. Upon finding his discarded disguise in the street, Cindy begins screaming “No” to the heavens – and gets run over by a car, presumably killing her (though she returns in the sequel alive and well).

As the credits roll, Shorty – parodying the rules of survival in Scream – explains via videocassette that he may be in prison or deceased, but provides rules for surviving such a situation… which turn out to be instructions for surviving a snatch-and-run.

REVIEW:

There was a time when the Wayans brothers were bona fide bos office comedic gold. It seems as if that time has come and gone, but the memories of Scary Movie should be revisited.

The best way I can figure to describe this film is that it is a spoof of all the horror movies of the time, such as Scream, I Know What You Did Last Summer, etc. For the most part it does a good job of it, but the plot seems to be too much of a rip off, rather than something original with inflections of those films. That could just be the direction I expected this to go, though.

Now, it should be said that if you can’t take over the top comedy, then this isn’t for you. No, it isn’t as toungue-in cheek as the greatest spoof film of all time, Airplane, but many of the jokes and comedic situations are out there. Take for instance the opening scene where a young girl, played by Carmen Electra is being chased. All of a sudden she happens to get stripped down to her bra and panties and a sprinkler comes on. In Baywatch fashion, she stops and poses, before continuing her attempt to escape. When she is caught and stabbed, the killer apparently rips out one of her implants, then she gets hit by her parents who are coming home. They don’t see her because they are engaged in fellatio. Scenes like this are commonplace in the flick.

For me, they work, but I can imagine some people would be highly offended and put off by this kind of humor, especially the sexually charged jokes. Fret not, though, this is not some sex farce.

What this film may be best known for is that it introduced the world to Anna Faris. Granted, she is much hotter and a much better actress now, it is still great to see her first major role.

Scary Movie is a really good film, but I thought it would have been better. I think it just relies too much on bad jokes for schock’s sake, rather some good old-fashioned comedy, which is really what most people want, contrary to popular belief. So, should you see this? Why of course! Why wouldn’t you? Lord knows we could all use a laugh, right?

4 out of 5 stars