Archive for Melonie Diaz

Be Kind Rewind

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , on July 30, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

Jerry is a junkyard worker who attempts to sabotage a power plant that he believes is melting his brain. But, when his plan goes awry, the magnetic field that he creates accidentally erases all of the videotapes in a local video store where his best friend Mike works. Fearing that the mishap will cost Mike his job, the two friends team up to keep the store’s only loyal customer–a little old lady with a tenuous grasp on reality–from realizing what has happened by recreating and re-filming every movie that she decides to rent. From “Back to the Future,” to “Robocop,” to “Rush Hour,” to “The Lion King,” Jerry and Mike become the biggest stars in their neighborhood by starring in the biggest movies ever made.

What people are saying:

“inviting, undemanding and altogether wonderful…you’ll want to see it again, or at least Swede it yourself.” 4 1/2 stars

“started out ok but the ending was way too sappy. on an added note, i do miss the long gone days of mom and pop video stores. But it was Blockbuster that did them in not the internet. I think they still existed for a while in densely populated urban areas (both rich and poor) where you could have enough customers in a few blocks to support a small business.  ” 2 stars

“It’s hard to get too cranky about a movie that, at heart, is a tribute to the joy of making things with your friends.” 3 1/2 stars

“Mos Def has the screen presence of a bowl of fruit. Aside from that, the film is well shot and manages to convey a sense of nostalgia as other users have pointed out. ” 3 stars

“The film begins rather unrealistically but soon develops into a great story. Jack Black fuels the flick with humour as the comedic colossus he is and it powers on with great film references and balances it out with some heartfelt moments.” 4 stars

Revisited: Hamlet 2

Posted in Movie Reviews, Revisited with tags , , , , , on June 24, 2015 by Mystery Man

PLOT (spoiler alert!!!):

Dana Marschz is a recovering alcoholic and failed actor who has become a high school drama teacher in Tucson, Arizona, “where dreams go to die”. Despite considering himself an inspirational figure, he only has two enthusiastic students, Rand Posin and Epiphany Sellars, and a history of producing poorly received school plays that are essentially stage adaptations of popular Hollywood films (his latest being Erin Brockovich). When the new term begins, a new intake of students are forced to transfer into his class as it is the only remaining arts elective available due to budget cutbacks; they are generally unenthusiastic and unconvinced by Dana’s pretensions, and Dana comes into conflict with Octavio, one of the new students.

Dana is floored when Principal Rocker notifies him that the drama program is to be shut down at the end of the term. Seeking to inspire his students, Dana undertakes to write and produce an original play: a sequel to Hamlet featuring time travel to avoid the deaths of the characters, and new, more controversial content, including the introduction of Jesus Christ as one of the characters, complete with a song-and-dance number titled “Rock Me Sexy Jesus”. The kids gradually warm to the project, but Rand – cast as a bi-curious Laertes and overshadowed by Octavio as Hamlet – storms out of the drama group and provides a copy of the play’s script to Principal Rocker, who orders Dana to stop the controversial production.

Dana is further traumatized when his wife Brie leaves him for the uninteresting, but fertile, boarder Gary they had taken into their home to supplement their modest income, and reveals that he himself is infertile. Despondent, Dana falls off the wagon and tries to abandon the project, but his students encourage him to continue, arranging an abandoned warehouse and rave spot, technical assistance, and security being provided by the high school’s football and wrestling teams. Dana also learns that the cancellation of the play has become a civil liberties issue encouraged by fanatical ACLU activist Cricket Feldstein. As a result, the play opens to a sold-out house, including a critic from The New York Times. Rand returns to the group, apologizing for his desertion; Dana allows him to return to the role of Laertes.

The play itself initially meets with a mixed reception, due to its controversial content and mangling of the original play; in keeping with a running joke throughout the movie, much of the content revolves around the characters using time travel to mend their troubled relationships with their fathers; it ends with both Hamlet and Jesus forgiving their fathers for the wrongs done to them. Although initially reluctant to engage with the play, with several protesters infiltrating the audience to stage a direct protest, the play gradually wins the audience over. The film ends with Dana and his favorite actress, Elisabeth Shue – whom he is now dating – meeting Dana’s students to prepare for the show’s Broadway opening, complete with original cast.

REVIEW:

I’m pretty sure when William Shakespeare wrote Hamlet, he did not have any notion that there would ever be a “sequel” to it. Well folks, here have Hamlet 2, but fret not, the film is not a sequel to Shakespeare’s play. The title comes from a play that is performed during the film. Confused yet?

What is this about?

With his department in danger of being cut, high school drama teacher Dana Marschz pens a heretical sequel to William Shakespeare’s “Hamlet” and exhorts his students to stage it in this sardonic comedy that riffs on the “inspirational teacher” genre.

What did I like?

Support the arts. There is a real problem in this country, and it involves the eradication of arts programs in schools, while sports and other activities go untouched. Without going into “preachy” territory, this film touches on how this very subject, when it is said that the theater department will be cut at the end of term. Also, Steve Coogan’s character apparently doesn’t get paid for teaching. How that happened, I don’t quite know. It is nice to see a film bring about awareness to the general public, though.

Push the boundaries. Remember the days when people weren’t walking on eggshells? A time when we weren’t afraid of offending anyone and if we did, so what? When did we get so soft and easily offended, I wonder? At any rate, this titular play is a mess, I won’t dispute that, but the hodge-podge of characters, including a modern take on Jesus is what we need today. Something that will remind everyone that it is ok to laugh and not be offended, as long as the comedy isn’t malicious. This makes me glad that this film was very limited in its release because, much in the same way the school cracked down on the play, I can imagine studios would have had a cow about the subject matter and demanded it be changed.

Babysitter. Remember Elisabeth Shue? Well, she may best be known as the babysitter in Adventures in Babysitting. She did a few films after that, but for the most part she disappeared from the business, only to resurface in this playing herself. While she hasn’t become a huge star since, her career has benefitted, as she has had a couple of lead roles, most notable in Piranha 3D. Say what you will about this flick, and celebrities making comebacks in small independent films playing themselves (remember Neil Patrick Harris in Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle), it seems to work.

What didn’t I like?

Home life. In school, did you ever think about what kind of home life your teachers had? I know I didn’t, with the exception of pregnancies, divorces, etc. Life changing events like that, you can’t help but wonder. I’m sure these students are no different, especially the ones that were just shoved into that class because they couldn’t put them anywhere else. So, if the kids don’t care, why should we? Someone didn’t get this memo, because anytime they could slip in Coogan’s wife, their roommate, and various other personal problems, they did. Was this meant to develop his character? Perhaps, but I’m not sure that is succeeded.

Acting…or overacting. Playing a theater teacher can’t exactly have been easy. I say this because on top of conventional acting, one has to overact. With this character Coogan is playing, he really has to overdo it, but I wonder if it was too much. The eccentricities of this character are well-known before we’re even half-way through the picture. Does Coogan need to go as overboard as he does? That really is up to the individual to judge, but I wasn’t a fan.

Class. This is what appears to be a fairly large high school. How is it that only 2 kids sign up for drama each year? I can understand the shoving of the other kids into that class. That kind of thing happens at all schools. What doesn’t happen, though, is the complete lack of students. If this kind of thing went on in any other place, the drama teacher would have been fired, or the program cut due to lack of interest.

Hamlet 2, the independent comedy that had all the promise in the world, but fell flat on its face. Still, it has developed a bit of a cult following. People, such as myself, will watch, no matter what. Do I recommend this? Yes, it is the kind of film that will start plenty of discussion around the water cooler.

3 1/2 out of 5 stars

Assasination of a High School President

Posted in Comedy, Drama, Independent, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , on July 28, 2010 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

Bobby Funke (Reece Thompson) is a less than popular high school sophomore with a dream to get into Northwestern University’s summer journalism program. Although Bobby claims he’s a great writer, he’s never finished an article for St. Donovan’s School Newspaper. The editor-in-chief Clara, (Melonie Diaz), assigns Bobby to do an article on Paul Moore, the student body president. Bobby attempts to get an interview, but is unable to get a story out of Paul and is bullied by Paul’s friends. Paul is the star of the basketball team and on a game night, Paul takes a fall and injures his knee. The next morning Principal Kirkpatrick (Bruce Willis) discovers the SATs have been stolen from a safe in his office. Kirkpatrick rounds up his “usual suspects” of high school misfits along with Bobby to question them. The group is innocent but Kirkpatrick warns them all to watch their step.

When senior Francesca Facchini (Mischa Barton) solicits Bobby’s help tracking down the set of stolen SATs, Funke uncovers a story. He sets on a large scale investigation and links Paul Moore to the crime. He writes an article pointing the finger at Paul. Kirkpatrick forces Paul to open his locker and the SATs fall out. As a result of his sleuthing, Funke becomes one of the most popular kids at St. Donovan’s. Clara decides to submit Funke’s article to Northwestern which earns Bobby a scholarship to the summer program. Funke wins the respect of everyone from Principal Kirkpatrick to the kid that farts on him in Spanish class and Francesca takes Funke to homecoming. As Funke’s popularity grows so do his suspicions. Paul confronts Bobby, proclaiming his innocence, stating that he got into Cornell but decided to take the test again to see if he could get a better score. Funke begins to wonder if the president really stole the SATs or if he’s just a pawn in a conspiracy.

Funke investigates even deeper into the lives of Paul’s shady friends, all members of the Student Council. He discovers their involvement with drug dealing. The Student Council had actually stolen the SATs along with other tests throughout the year, modifying the marks of the best students to make them doubt their test-taking abilities and turn to the Student Council for performance-enhancing Adderrall and other speed-like medications. Funke says that while Paul wasn’t a part of the scam, group ringleader Marlon Piazza (Luke Grimes) has Paul framed to avoid being caught. Funke also finds out that Francesca lead him along the entire time to keep him from finding out the truth. Francesca and Marlon, step-siblings, are revealed as lovers.

Funke confronts the group in the principal’s office. Marlon threatens to have Funke thrown out the window and frame it as a suicide, but his threat and confession are heard on the school’s intercom system. When Funke entered the room, he secretly turned on the microphone; Funke’s friends save him from being thrown out the window and Kirkpatrick rushes into the office, followed by the student body and Francesca. Francesca attempts to gain Funke’s trust again, only to be shut down and left to deal with Kirkpatrick’s punishment.

REVIEW:

Every now and then, a movie comes along that has the potential to be a truly great film, but just isn’t executed well. This is either due to bad directing, acting, or hat have you. Assassination of a High School President falls into that very category.

My expectations for this film weren’t very high. I mean, this wasn’t a bad film, mind you, but there just wasn’t anything to keep my interest.

The story was a great one, and in the right hands could have been a thing fo greatness, but the filmmaker was not the person to handle this. For some reason, this film noir story was set in a current high school setting. That right there should have tipped me off that the rest of this film was not going to be worth watching.

Most of the cast is unknowns, such as Luke Grimes, Reece Daniel Thompson, Melonie Diaz, etc., who do a great job with their parts that may very well led them to better things.

Bruce Willis’ character, that of a shell-shocked former military man who served in Desert Storm but is now a principal. Not exactly the usual work you’d expect from Willis, but he eats up the screen in each scene he’s in.

Mischa Barton doesn’t work for me as the hottest girl in school. Maybe a popular girl, but that’s stretching it ab it. I always thought she couldn’t act on The O.C., and this just further proved my point. On the other hand, she doesn’t look so anorexic here.

So, what is the verdict for Assassination of a High School President? Lots of potential, good story, decent cast, but none of these things help to make this film worth watching. It is such a bore than you don’t even question why it was indefinitely put on hold from a release in theaters, but instead went direct to DVD. I guess what I’m saying is don’t waste your time.

2 out fo 5 stars