Archive for the Comedy Category

Be Kind Rewind

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , on July 30, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

Jerry is a junkyard worker who attempts to sabotage a power plant that he believes is melting his brain. But, when his plan goes awry, the magnetic field that he creates accidentally erases all of the videotapes in a local video store where his best friend Mike works. Fearing that the mishap will cost Mike his job, the two friends team up to keep the store’s only loyal customer–a little old lady with a tenuous grasp on reality–from realizing what has happened by recreating and re-filming every movie that she decides to rent. From “Back to the Future,” to “Robocop,” to “Rush Hour,” to “The Lion King,” Jerry and Mike become the biggest stars in their neighborhood by starring in the biggest movies ever made.

What people are saying:

“inviting, undemanding and altogether wonderful…you’ll want to see it again, or at least Swede it yourself.” 4 1/2 stars

“started out ok but the ending was way too sappy. on an added note, i do miss the long gone days of mom and pop video stores. But it was Blockbuster that did them in not the internet. I think they still existed for a while in densely populated urban areas (both rich and poor) where you could have enough customers in a few blocks to support a small business.  ” 2 stars

“It’s hard to get too cranky about a movie that, at heart, is a tribute to the joy of making things with your friends.” 3 1/2 stars

“Mos Def has the screen presence of a bowl of fruit. Aside from that, the film is well shot and manages to convey a sense of nostalgia as other users have pointed out. ” 3 stars

“The film begins rather unrealistically but soon develops into a great story. Jack Black fuels the flick with humour as the comedic colossus he is and it powers on with great film references and balances it out with some heartfelt moments.” 4 stars

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How to Steal a Million

Posted in Classics, Comedy, Drama, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , on July 19, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

In this elegant “caper” film, Audrey Hepburn stars as the daughter of a wealthy Parisian (Hugh Griffith), whose hobby is copying famous works of art. His replica of a famed Cellini sculpture is inadvertently displayed in an art museum, and he begins to worry that he’ll lose his reputation once the experts evaluate the statuette. Audrey decides to rob the museum, and hires a burglar (Peter O’Toole) for that purpose. But the burglar is really a detective, who has every intention of arresting Audrey and her father when the deed is done.

What people are saying:

“A decent enough film, but I still can’t help but dislike Peter O’Toole for some reason. Hepburn is terrific, as usual. There isn’t much unusual in what’s going on here, but Eli Wallach’s character is a bit of an interesting character so he catches my attention when he’s on-screen.” 2 1/2 stars

“…the sort of genial, fluffy little caper flick that rarely gets made anymore, which isn’t necessarily a bad thing.” 3 1/2 stars

“A charming heist movie with a handsome leading man and ever beautiful Audrey, and of course interesting plot, funny jokes and interesting supporting roles that enrich the movie.” 4 stars

“Young Peter teams up with -glamorous as always- Audrey in this romantic comedy, set in Paris and revolving around a museum heist. The characters are entertaining, the plot jolly good fun & the performances remarkable. Overall, a good film to watch on an easy-going night in.” 3 1/2 stars

“Being a huge Audrey Hepburn fan this review may be a little biased. She never ceases to amaze me with how she can be somewhat versatile in her roles without sacrificing her notable style and ethereal beauty. The film itself is quite comical, and is almost like a romantic version of Ocean’s Eleven. Good movie for fans of Audrey, or Peter.” 5 stars

Two Weeks Notice

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews, Romantic with tags , , , , , on July 3, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

A woman finds herself attempting to foil one office romance while debating if she should take a chance on another in this romantic comedy. Lucy Kelton (Sandra Bullock) is a top-flight attorney who has risen to the position of Chief Legal Counsel for one of New York’s leading commercial real estate firms, the Wade Corporation. However, Lucy’s job has one significant drawback — George Wade (Hugh Grant), the eccentric and remarkably self-centered head of the firm. George seems entirely incapable of making a decision without Lucy’s advice, whether it actually involves a legal matter or not, and while she’s fond of George, being at his beck and call 24 hours a day has brought her to the end of her rope. In a moment of anger, Lucy gives her two weeks notice, and George reluctantly accepts, under one condition — Lucy has to hire her own replacement. After extensive research, Lucy picks June Carter (Alicia Witt), a Harvard Law graduate determined to make a career for herself. Lucy soon begins to suspect, however, that June plans to hasten her rise up the corporate ladder by winning George’s hand, leaving Lucy to wonder if she should warn George about his beautiful but calculating new attorney — and whether she should tell George that she has finally realized she’s in love with him.

What people are saying:

“Hugh Grant and Sandra Bullock basically play their patented movie selves in this overly familiar romantic comedy about corporate greed, social responsibility, personal promises and budding love.” 2 stars

“A familiar plot and typical Bullock flick. Woman intellect meets scatterbrain man, fall in love (neither one knows it), a falling out, and they supposedly live happily ever after. Grant always plays the somewhat down founded man and Bullock is always somewhat of dimwit. Also, there’s a cameo appearance (with a four-liner speech) by a certain billionaire, who could have been edited out and his appearance forgotten. Recommended to Bullock and Grant fans.” 3 stars

“Its only relevance is as a sign of its times. Really it’s no worse than Rock Hudson Doris Day movies, and maybe someday it will be misviewed as a classic as those movies are. There’s little pep to the proceedings, but plenty of star power.” 2 stars

“A rom com about a shallow and obscenely rich playboy (when he said he was calling for a lift, he meant his private helicopter) and a brainy cause-fighting attorney (she can rattle off names of General Counsels when suspected of concussion). Grant and Bullock deliver their cheeky wordplay (“I think you are the most selfish human being on the planet.” “Well that’s just silly. Have you met everybody on the planet?”) with impeccable comic timing and adorable chemistry.” 4 stars

“This is one of those rom-coms that does something unique: it actually gets you to care about the characters who are supposed to be together. The way this movie does it is by having these characters actually be good people, despite their differing ideologies, an achievement that is difficult enough to manage in real life, let alone in a movie. There aren’t any memorable lines, but the charm of both Sandra Bullock and Hugh Grant is enough to make this movie worth watching.” 3 1/2 stars

American Pie: Beta House

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on June 30, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

It’s pledge time, and as fraternity row becomes rife with eager young freshman looking to make an impression on campus, the stage is set for Greek rivalry so fierce it will resurrect a competition that was previously banned by the administration. Great Falls high school graduates Erik and Cooze are about to become college freshmen, and once they do, the campus of a modest Michigan college will never be the same. Immediately aligning themselves with the notorious Beta Delta Xi house, the boys dive headlong into the party scene while suddenly being swept up in an ongoing rivalry between their new brothers and a rival house with a power-hungry president. Now the only way for the Beta Delta Xi brothers to prove their true worth is to resurrect The Games – a long-banned competition that will discern the true kings of campus once and for all.

What people are saying:

“Raunchy college comedy is sexist, dumb, and boring.” 1 star

“the first three are obviously not much like anything thats come after them but if your a straight guy you’ll probably enjoy this soft core porn comedy.” 3 1/2 stars

“More topless & sex scenes than ever with practically no plot or of the original cast other than (Eugene Levy) Noah Levenstein aka Jim’s father who’s lead quite an interesting life other than being the father to Jim from the first “American Pie”. Not much to tell other than it was frat boys versus the Geek boys all over again…” 3 stars

“…what was once a fresh slice of teen comedy has become a slab of stale crudeness” 2 stars

“Best one so far. Could not stop laughing. The actor that plays Dwight Stifler should get his own spin off movie because he was fantastic in this role and reminded me so much of myself when I was in college. This was a solid step up above The Naked Mile and a lot more out there then the first 3 films.” 5 stars

Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip

Posted in Comedy, Family, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 18, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

Through a series of misunderstandings, Alvin, Simon and Theodore come to believe that Dave is going to propose to his new girlfriend in Miami…and dump them. They have three days to get to him and stop the proposal, saving themselves not only from losing Dave but possibly from gaining a terrible stepbrother.

What people are saying:

“In some respects, Alvin and the Chipmunks: The Road Chip is a marginal improvement over prior installments, although this in no way qualifies as a recommendation.” 1 star

“A cute and harmless family movie which will definitely gain the approval of the kids as the three most famous chipmunks venture to Miami with a stereotypical rebelling teen. Despite a predictable plot, the film makes a decent enough movie for children to enjoy.” 3 stars

“I think Alvin and the Chipmunks franchise should’ve quit after the second movie. The third one was boring at best. We had four kids with us. They were pretty bored after the first 30 minutes. There were some good songs but they did not make up for the very forced story line. Save your money and watch it on a rental.” 2 stars

“Irritating characters, little semblance of a plot, weak gags, and sub-par performances … result in a film that doesn’t even have enough going on to interest a five-year-old.” 1 star

“Definitely better than the third movie, which, unfortunately, was pretty lame. “The Road Chip” had some great music and was genuinely funny in many places. Though I agree with some other reviews that this was not a movie particularly geared toward young children, I think that young adults ages 12 or 13 on up, including adults, would really appreciate it. Younger children would like the music and some of the comedic lines and scenes, too.” 4 stars

The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement

Posted in Chick Flicks, Comedy, Family, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , on June 7, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT (spoiler alert!!!):

Five years after the first film, Crown Princess of Genovia Amelia “Mia” Thermopolis (Anne Hathaway) has just graduated from Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School and is returning to Genovia with her bodyguard Joe (Héctor Elizondo). There, she will await her reign once her grandmother, Queen Clarisse (Julie Andrews), steps down as Queen. During Mia’s 21st birthday party, she dances with all the eligible bachelors in hope of finding a husband. She becomes attracted to a handsome gentleman named Nicholas (Chris Pine). During the course of the night, Mia’s tiara falls off and is caught by a Member of Parliament, Viscount Mabrey (John Rhys-Davies) who secretly plans to steal Mia’s crown. While the Parliament is in-session the next morning, Mia stumbles upon a hidden room that allows her to secretly listen in. Viscount Mabrey reveals his nephew, Lord Devereaux, is another heir to the Genovian throne. Despite Queen Clarisse’s objection, the only way Mia can assume her duties as Queen is if she marries within the month. Clarisse invites Lord Devereaux to stay at the palace, while Mia is shocked to discover Lord Devereaux is Nicholas. Mia’s best friend Lilly Moscovitz (Heather Matarazzo) surprises her by visiting. Together, they pick through potential husbands. Mia eventually chooses Andrew Jacoby (Callum Blue), Duke of Kenilworth and days later they are engaged. Mabrey plans to have Nicholas woo Mia and dissolve the engagement.

For a ceremony, Mia is to ride sidesaddle but does not know how. Queen Clarisse provides an ancestral wooden leg decoy to make it look like she’s riding sidesaddle. Mabrey spooks Mia’s horse with a rubber snake and Joe rushes to Mia’s aide, but accidentally tears off the wooden leg. Humiliated, Mia flees to the stables, where Nicholas fails to comfort her. At a garden party, Mia and Nicholas quarrel about Mia’s relationship with Andrew; Nicholas tricks Mia into admitting she doesn’t love him. Angered, she argues but instead gets bombarded by a kiss. At first, she kisses him back but then backs away. Nicholas pursues her even more, which causes both of them to fall into a fountain. Queen Clarisse finally tells Mia that her behavior with Nicholas needs to stop.

During the Genovian Independence Day parade, Mia sees some boys picking on a little girl (Abigail Breslin), and abruptly halts the parade to comfort the girl. Learning the children are orphans, Mia has a vendor give them all tiaras and lets them walk with her in the parade. Everyone is impressed by her act of generosity, while Mabrey sees it as a political maneuver. Mia later decides to convert one of the royal palaces into a temporary children’s center. That night, Mia has her bachelorette/sleepover party, where Queen Clarisse surfs on a mattress and sings a duet with Princess Asana (Raven-Symoné), one of Mia’s good friends. In the meantime, Mabrey realizes Nicholas has fallen for Mia, but Nicholas says that Mia will never love him. Nicholas comes upon Mia as she is practicing her archery as part of her coronation rites. He helps her succeed in getting the arrow to hit the bullseye, something she had been struggling with. Nicholas then informs Mia that he is leaving, but asks to see her just one more time before he goes. She declines, saying she is under close guard.

That night, Nicholas appears outside Mia’s window and asks her to come out. Lilly encourages her to go, and Mia sneaks out. They ride out to a lake where they share secrets, dance and eventually fall asleep. They awaken to find a man in a boat videotaping them. Mia thinks Nicholas set her up, while he insists he had no idea. By the time Mia gets back to the palace, the scandalous footage is already being broadcast. Andrew is disappointed and kisses Mia to see if there is a romantic spark between them. They realize they do not love each other, but do not call off the wedding for the good of Genovia. The wedding is to take place the following day, and Mia’s mother Helen (Caroline Goodall) comes with her new husband Patrick (Sean O’Bryan) and their newborn son Trevor. Nicholas decides against attending, but his surly housekeeper Gretchen informs him that Mabrey engineered their televised scandal.

Right before the wedding, Joe informs Mia that Nicholas is innocent. Queen Clarisse encourages Mia to follow her heart, something she has never done and has now cost her Joe, the only man she truly loved. Mia reenters the church, and after pointing out how her grandmother has ruled Genovia while unmarried for a number of years, she tells the members of parliament in the audience to consider the significant women in their lives (such as their wives, sisters, daughters and nieces) and questions if they would have them do what they’re trying to force her to do (marrying people they don’t love). Mabrey cites the law again and once again suggests that his nephew be named King, but just then, Nicholas not only refuses the crown, but also disowns Mabrey as his uncle. Mia proposes the law on royal marriages be abolished, and the Parliament unanimously gives its assent. Encouraged by Mia to have her own happy ending, Clarisse proposes to Joe and they are promptly married.

About a week later, Mia is preparing for her coronation when Nicholas shows up. He professes his love for Mia on bended knees, and they share a romantic kiss. The next day, Mia is crowned “Her Majesty Amelia Mignonette Thermopolis Renaldi, Queen of Genovia”, with all in attendance in the royal palace.

An epilogue shows that Genovian Parliament now allows female members, one of whom is Charlotte. And Queen Mia officially opens the children’s home

REVIEW:

Sometimes when the end credits roll on a film you wonder if you will ever see the characters again and what will they be up to the next time we see them, should we be privileged enough to see them again. This was the case with The Princess Diaries. The film ended in a way that left the audience wondering what happens next. Enter The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement, a film that I swear I was not meant to see (up until tonight, I have never been able to watch it straight through for various reasons). With all that aside, let’s see if this film is comparable to its predecessor.

What is this about?

Directed by Garry Marshall, The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement picks up where its predecessor left off — that is, with American teenager Mia Thermopolis (Anne Hathaway) reeling over the news that she is a princess within the royal family of Genovia, a little-known European nation with a population of barely 50,000. As promised, Mia, along with her best friend, Lilly (Heather Matarazzo), travels to Genovia after their high-school graduation. The unlikely princess has hardly settled into the castle, let alone begun representing the country, when she learns that a larger title is approaching more rapidly than expected; it seems as though Mia will have to take over as queen. Suddenly, in addition to further schooling on the etiquette of royalty, Mia finds herself with a daunting prospect — according to Genovian law, all princesses must be married before they can be crowned.

What did I like?

One more once. Not too long before the first film was made, Julie Andrews underwent surgery on her throat/vocal chords. The operation was a success, but she was no longer allowed to sing. I’m not sure what happened, but we get a song from her during the slumber party, albeit nowhere near as strong a vocal performance as we expect from her. Still, it is great to hear her sing a few notes.

In her skin. In this second time out, Anne Hathaway, as Princess Mia, seems much more confident both as an actress and the character as a royal. Can you imagine what this would have been like if she was still bumbling around like she was when we first met her? Granted, she does still have those moments that remind us that while she is the would be queen, the clumsy prep school girl is still in there somewhere.

Grandmother. Julie Andrews’ character is on her way out of the royal spotlight and off the throne as Mia takes her rightful place as ruler of Genovia. It is because of this that I think she is able to not be such a “stick in the mud” and be more of a grandmother towards her granddaughter. We get a few scenes where she is chewing her out, of course, but for the most part, she is the dream grandmother we all wish we had. She had poise, class, elegance, compassion…not to mention she’s Julie Freakin’ Andrews!!!

What didn’t I like?

Nevermore. Aside from her best friend, Lily, who was flown in from California (and felt a bit forced into the film), Mia seems to be close to Princess Asana. There are two glaring issues I want to bring up with this. First, if they are so close, why is Asana only in a couple of scenes? Second, who is she? How did they meet? Why are they so close? Mia grew up with Lily and they were both outsider freaks in high school, so we know that’s why they were so close, but with Asana, we get none of that. She’s just a random character that gets to sing with Julie Andrews.

Formula 1. Is it me or with every film, book, or tv show that involves a royal change of power of sorts, we get someone who wants to prove they are next in line. This is such a cliché’ nowadays. One could tell what was going to happen before it actually does, just by the film’s title and the type of film this is. Come on filmmakers, be creative!

Lionel. Joe, who is retiring when the Queen leaves the throne, is sacked with an intern in his last days. What I found odd about this guy was how he reminded me of Michael from the first film, but with darker skin and slightly shorter hair. This got me thinking…with the way Mia fawned over Michael in the first film, wouldn’t it have been a cool idea for him to show up as Lionel in disguise and be her dream ending? Of course, then Chris Pine’s whole character in this film would be worthless, but he goes on too much bigger and better things after this, so he’ll be fine.

Final verdict on The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement? Let’s see…it repeats some of the same notes from the first film. The soundtrack isn’t as catchy this go-round. Chemistry among the characters is so-so, but I actually believed it in the archery scene with Hathaway and Pine. The mattress surfing scene was perhaps the most fun part of the film. Do I recommend this? Yes, a good (non animated) family film is hard to find. While not great, it is somewhat entertaining and that’s worth something. However, I would suggest going for the first film, if you can.

3 3/4 out of 5 stars

Swing State

Posted in Comedy, Movie Reviews with tags , , , , , , , on May 14, 2017 by Mystery Man

PLOT:

Seattle based rock DJ, Ethan Smith, hosts a popular radio program called Ears Wide Shut which appeals to his passion for music but unfortunately, pays a very low wage. When the conservative host of a right wing program also featured on the radio station goes missing, Ethan is called in to cover his absence. Donning a wig and bowtie, he invents the persona, Charles Fern, and brands himself “the new voice for the Right”. Ethan intends the charade to be a one-time deal but his listeners find that the fictitious Fern is the tough talker they have been desperate to hear. When the talk show enjoys a huge spike in ratings following Ethan’s hosting gig, he is asked to take over the high-paying host job full-time and pushed onto the national stage where he may make history but lose everything that matters to him in the process.

What people are saying:

“Swing State goes for light and broad comedy, while mocking both sides.” 2 1/2 stars

“Initially I didn’t know what to expect when I put the film on but as I continued to watch I found it to be a wonderful movie. It had a lot of humorous moments and a well written story line. I think it had a fun flare to add to all this political talk we have had going on. If you enjoy a good story line and whity movie give this one a go!” 5 stars

“I loved this movie! Definitely brought a new flare to political movies at least for me. I thought the acting and writing was well done and overall it was a great film.” 5 stars

“What happened to these actors? Why? This is an awful movie. Everything about it is really bad. The writing, acting and directing are shameful.” 1/2 star

“This is a dumb idea poorly executed. The worst writing of any film I have seen in the last year at least. The dialogue is stupid. The acting is pathetic. Beh looks like a fool. The movie is sexist and instead of being satirical is really just bad. The director could not save the terrible writing. Taryn Manning should pretend she never did this film.” 1/2 star